Own The Change You Want to Achieve

strong powerful women

Often the biggest challenge I face is self-doubt.

I have so many aspirations, dreams and passions, but I doubt my ability to realize them.

Notebooks overflow with my ideas, but it is Doubt that keeps them cocooned within the pages; Doubt that whispers ‘stick to what you know’; Doubt that says ‘it’s too risky’.

I feel as if I’m teetering on the edge of a precipice, to step back is to give power to my doubts, to step off  is to believe in my own power.

The power to change.

Transformation

I’ve been embracing 6 weeks of change on my Mind & Body Transformation Challenge, and that has ignited a spark within me, the spark of self belief.

I can change when I commit with passion and purpose to my vision.

Changing my body has been a great; I’m stronger, leaner and healthier, but changing the way I think has been profoundly liberating. Through personal reflection, research and positive connections I’ve started to change the  toxic habits that were barriers to my success.

Knowing and understanding myself has enabled me to tap into something I didn’t know I had; my own innate  power! It might sound like a cliché, but you have to own the change you want, or else it doesn’t truly belong to you.

I own the change I have created.

And this week I’m about to make another change; I’m stepping off the precipice!

I have an opportunity that both excites and terrifies me; up till now I have been giving power to my doubts by doubting my power to succeed.

Today I accepted that opportunity and stopped doubting my power.

Do you experience self-doubt? What do you do to chase the doubts away?

Sign-up to follow Lisa at mummy2mum to see where this opportunity takes her next!

 

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Find Your Purpose & Commit To Success

Y chart for weight loss successI’m 5 weeks into my Mind & Body Transformation challenge and I’m feeling stronger and more determined than ever. But, I do know that the journey will be longer than 6 weeks!

Is that really news to me? Deep down I always knew that it wouldn’t be a ‘quick fix’ and that I had to embrace life long change, but I wasn’t ready to face that at the beginning of this challenge.

At the beginning to make the sacrifices necessary for weight loss I consoled myself that it was only for a short period, and this helped me to cut out the crap. As the challenge has gone on I’ve felt stronger mentally and physically, and determination has taken over! What used to feel like a sacrifice now feels like a kindness to my body; how I eat and exercise reflects who I want to become.

The 6 week challenge will officially end in a week, and before it does I’m reaffirming my purpose and my vision while my commitment is running high. In this way when I celebrate the achievements I have made I will look at my goals and know that I’m only part of the way there.

Embed Your Goals In Sensory Memory

As a teacher when I want my students to embed a concept I use a tool called a Y chart. This is really effective because it gets them to engage with a concept on a sensory level. You can take any subject for a Y chart and describe what it feels, looks and sounds like; for a weight loss goal this is perfect!

Having a clear purpose that is embedded at the sensory level helps me to stay connected to my goal in a visual way.

Y chart for weight loss

Create Your Y Chart:

Equipment: scissors, glue, coloured pens, coloured paper.

  1. Get a large sheet of coloured paper (A3 or bigger)
  2. In the middle of the sheet write your focus (weight loss, body transformation)
  3. Draw a huge capital Y on your sheet, make it appear to go behind your focus  (see my photo)
  4. Your page should now be sectioned into 3 parts as the Y separates the areas
  5. Label the sections; Feels Like, Sounds Like, Looks Like (the order doesn’t matter)
  6. Now comes the fun part – filling it in!
  7. Feel Like – this section should reflect the things you’ll feel once you’ve achieved your goal eg strength in my mind & body
  8. Sounds Like – imagine what you’ll hear people saying to you once you’ve achieved your goal. “You look great in that bikini!” What sort of words do you want to hear yourself saying? “Size 14 is too big for me!”
  9. Looks Like – use images in this section, either body shapes that inspire you or photos of yourself when you were at a weight that you associate with feeling happy.
  10. Now sit back and admire your work, it should reflect a very personal vision of where you want to be.
  11. Stick it up somewhere where you will see it every day; mine’s in front of my desk where I write, but on the wardrobe door, bathroom door or inside the pantry are good places that you’ll visit frequently.

Y chart for weight loss

Debuting on Ten to Twenty Parenting

I’m excited to share a fist-pump moment with you today; I’m debuting on Ten to Twenty Parenting!

It’s a nerve-wracking experience submitting an article to a popular site with a large following, but the day Ten to Twenty Parenting wrote and said they wanted to publish 15 Moments That Will Change Your Parenting Journey, I was jumping up and down with excitement!

Life has changed over the last 15 years and although time slowed down during those long teething nights, it sped up during the fun stuff, leaving me shocked to discover that my baby is now 15! I had noticed that he was growing up, but those little daily changes are shocking to behold when they are all added together.

Read more about my parenting journey and the unexpected milestones that I found along the way at Ten To Twenty Parenting.

 

How To Help your Teen Achieve Revision Success! Part 2

Revisions strategies for teens 1This week our family have hit another parenting milestone; our 14 year old is about to sit his first exams! This has left me puzzling how I can best support him to accomplish revision success, without heading into the minefield of teenage resistance!

In Part 1 of my revision series I discussed how to identify the goals of revision and engage in a joint planning phase with your child. Today I’m looking at the how to of revision.

What does your child need to do to achieve revision success?

 What The Research Says…

As parents it’s easy to feel alienated by the technology that our children are using to study with. I know that when I was revising I created hand written notes, read paper versions of books and created colour coded index cards!

When my children are revising it often looks the same as when they’re relaxing – laptop open, headphones on and a glazed expression!

These strategies for revising have been popular for years:

  • Re-reading notes
  • Highlighting sections of text
  • Re-writing notes

These are certainly strategies that I have used, but it turns out that trying to memorise information is NOT the most effective revision strategy!

Research shows that the key to retaining information is to become deeply engaged with the material, in educational terms this is called a ‘depth of processing’, and helps the information get deposited for the long term in your memory bank.

My Favourite 5 Strategies For Engagement

If engagement is the key to revision success, how can we find activities that create this depth of processing for our children?

Here are my Favourite 5 strategies that increase engagement whilst addressing the goals of revision (understanding, synthesis, recall, consolidation and reflection).

  1. 3 Qs (Quick Quiz Questions) – create questions using your notes, write out a corresponding answer sheet then put the quiz away and test yourself in a couple of days. Research shows that repeated testing is a successful strategy for raising engagement, and leaving a few days between revising and testing is the most effective way.
  2. Quizletquizlet is an awesome online tool that allows you to make flash cards which you can then use in  activities against the clock such as pairing, questioning and testing. Research shows that practicing retrieving information is one of the best ways to retain it.
  3. SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) – SWOT Analysis is a great revision tool to encourage you to re-think ideas and make new connections, especially good for humanities and English. You can download a template here .
  4. Mind Mapping – this creative tool increases engagement by  finding connections and practicing retrieving information. Mind maps can be colourful and elaborate or simple and streamlined, Tony Busan (the father of mind maps) has some inspiring examples of mind maps here.
  5. Fishbone Diagram – this is a great tool to summarise multiple ideas and can form the basis of an essay plan for written subjects. Check out my example of a fishbone diagram based on this revision series below. You can download a template here.

fishbone diagrams ansucccesful revision strategy

So good luck to all the Mum & Dad’s out there supporting their teens through the exam minefields over the next few weeks!

And remember…

Hold on to your teen during adolescence